The Tao of Gaming

Boardgames and lesser pursuits

Posts Tagged ‘Dyson Sphere Program

Dyson Sphere Program

So, as I mentioned before, I got Dyson Sphere Program. This is the latest in the (growing) line of Automation games, which I guess was started by Minecraft, but as far as I’m concerned, started with Factorio (which I’ve now been playing for 4 years). How much time have I spent playing DSP in the last few days? That depends on how you keep time.

Because it turns out … my computer doesn’t have a powerful enough graphics card to play it. Which is to say … my laptop has no graphics card. Unlike Factorio (which tries to run at a set speed, and sometimes drops frames if the graphics get complicated), if DSP slows down due to graphics issues, the game slows down. I first noticed this when I said “Huh, I’ve only been playing for 40 minutes according to the game, feels longer.” It was closer to two hours. So I’m either four hours into the game, or fifteen hours, or somewhere in between.

Look — this is a game where you start by chopping down some trees and rocks and eventually build a Dyson Sphere, so you have to scale up. If you already know you love/hate that, nothing will change. However, a few thoughts.

At the four hour mark (etc) I have literally just started my first Dyson Swarm and have unlocked (but not yet started) the third “Science” type (which you need to unlock more advanced technologies).

  • Its pretty. If you have a graphics card, its pretty and runs at a normal speed. I stood for a few seconds watching my EM rail guns launching solar sails over the horizon (100m away) into the setting sun. (There’s a reddit thread for prettiest screenshot, and some of the entries are amazing).
  • The twists (from Factorio’s POV) are threefold:
    • The planets are tiny little things (think “The Little Prince”) so the curvature of the planet matters. You literally cannot put more than twenty or so assemblers in a parallel line before one of the lines has to jog. (I don’t know the exact number). And they aren’t perfectly level either (apart from just water and crevasses).
    • You can build UP. Conveyor belts can stack at levels, some buildings can be stacked, etc.
    • You can (fairly quickly) unlock technology to sail between planets. Factorio has “outposts for resources” but here you can’t lay a conveyor belt back to the main base. You either have to literally hand carry everything back and forth, or build an interstellar logistic system. (If you are running at normal speed, a trip might take a minute or two).
  • It’s an early access games, so the controls leave much to be desired. No mappable hotkeys, confusing tutorials, etc. I almost uninstalled it before even landing on the starting planet, because how to navigate to it was not obvious, and I missed and wasn’t clear how to turn around. Right now this game is a dancing bear, because there so much of it works … sort of.
  • There are many … many recipes and ingredients. There are maybe 100 intermediate components (things that don’t do anything, just a step along the path to the next thing). Factorio felt overwhelming the first few times in this, but this is a level above.
  • You start with robots to build stuff, but its much slower than clicking to place (especially in my case). You have to tech up to make them fast. They really need blueprints though, because controlling everything by hand likely won’t scale well. Copy-Paste!

Anyway, I don’t think this will be a thousand hour experience, because I’m not zen enough, but I don’t consider my money wasted. I have little hope that the devs (a five person team) will make it fast enough that my laptop will suddenly be good enough, but I can while away a few hours here and there.

Written by taogaming

February 6, 2021 at 7:27 pm

The Line between Inspiration and Theft

I saw the announcement for Terraforming Mars: Area Expedition(aka TM: The card game) because someone commented something to the effect of “They ripped off Race for the Galaxy.” And — uh, yeah. There are some differences, but the five phases, simultaneous selection, etc. Its all there. (You can’t select the same phase twice in a row).

Last week I tried the Dyson Sphere Program video game and then returned it (because it was somewhat clunky), but after watching some Katherine of Sky videos I re-bought it. (KoS is — to me — the Bob Ross of Twitch. Simply a joy to listen to). Let’s be clear — DSP takes a lot from Factorio. But it adds innovations — you are in a universe where an Astronomical Unit is a 40 km and you can run around a planet’s equator in a minute or two. Factorio meets The Little Prince. The curvature of each planet and its orbital inclination matter! Its three dimensional in a real way, and that’s a huge change. (A beautiful, albeit clunky, game).

I guess the true test is — did you build something new? When you are standing on the shoulders of giants, is it so you can see farther, or are you just pissing on them? Perhaps TM:AE does something new. It’s easy to imagine. Race where you can’t repeat your role selection is a new game (and possibly a great variant). But the fact that this “inspired by” game is tacked onto an established property by an already established company makes it feel a bit dirty. Time will tell.

Full review of DSP later.

(Slay the Spire Update — 7 wins out of 24 games so far, and only two deaths in Act I).

Written by taogaming

February 5, 2021 at 9:59 pm