The Tao of Gaming

Boardgames and lesser pursuits

1775: Rebellion

1775: Rebellion is a small light wargame covering the revolution. Each side has two factions, so this lists 2-4 on the box, but this is definitely fixed fun.

On each turn, you draw (nice, solid) initiative cubes to determine which faction goes next. On a factions turn they get reinforcements and play a movement card and 0-2 events. The movement card say show many armies move (and how far). An army can contain faction cubes of any color, but must have at least one cube of the active faction.

(Apart from the two British and two American factions, you have Indians, Hessians, & French). In combat each side fires, and each faction gets their own dice. So British Regulars hit half the time and never flee. The 3rd possible side is “Miss, but you may retreat if able.” The loyalist militia aren’t nearly as disciplined, as you might imagine.

The kicker is that each side is limited to the number of dice provided. So a mixed bag of two regulars and two militia will throw more dice than 5 regulars (each faction has 2 or 3 dice). The events are just minor kickers.

Cards played are gone, and each faction has a “Treaty of Paris” card (which provides a powerful move). When either side has played both their treaty cards, the game ends on that turn and whoever has sole control of the most colonies wins.

Rebellion looks good. I’d never buy it, but it’s a fast-ish diversion. There’s some room for maneuver, but really this comes down to initiative order (it’s theoretically possible for one side to get 4 turns in a row and just devastate a position), cards and dice. There’s an advanced scenario (The Siege of Quebec) but I don’t imagine it’s much harder.

Rating — Indifferent

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Written by taogaming

August 28, 2013 at 8:21 pm

Posted in Reviews

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  1. I enjoyed this game a lot. It’s tense all the way through and your decisions matter. I agree that there’s plenty of luck, and luck has a meaningful influence on who wins, but I can enjoy games like that. I especially like the way losing all the colonies in an area really hurts, so you need to watch for that from the start.

    Eric brosius

    September 3, 2013 at 4:55 pm


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