The Tao of Gaming

Boardgames and lesser pursuits

7 Thoughts ’bout 11

Go read Tom Rosen’s Review of the Games of 2011. Or just skip it and know that he hates everything, but mostly doesn’t care.

  1. I’m reminded of that Anton Ego quote from Ratatouille. At least, the first part. “In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk very little yet enjoy a position over those who offer up their work and their selves to our judgement. We thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to write and read.” Tom gets to keep his curmudgeon card.
  2. It sounds to me like someone has a case of the JASE!
  3. If a woman constantly dated a string of losers, then bitterly complained to you (a non-loser) about all the poor choices she made while you secretly pined for her, you would be starring in a romantic comedy! And also, you might have the nagging thought “Well, then, stop dating losers.” Tom (and the rest of the game world), it’s intervention time — “Don’t buy crappy games. Don’t feel a need to play them. If you do play them, feel free to abandon them at the first sign of trouble.” Most certainly of all, don’t expect to find a revolutionary game more than once every few years.
  4. The only title I’ve played on that list is Airlines:Europe. I liked Airlines and Union Pacific enough to play them both 10 times and I like the new design, but perhaps I was rash to purchase it.  My own personal rule is stronger than “Don’t buy crappy games.” It’s “Try to buy only great games, or at the very least, games that tried something new.” I claim no particular moral insight, I’m trodding a path that I’ve seen time and time again in game collectors. You could call it burnout if you like (I did, before it happened to me).
  5. Let us now remember the second part of the Ego quote — “There are times when a critic truly risks something, and that is the discovery and defense of the new.” The comments brim with Ameritrash that arouse my interest. The games listed in the article all sounded like JASE (some of which I like). I need to hear more about space battles via crokinole-style flicking, or why Eminent Domain rocks for people who hate dominion.
  6. I’ve been spending the last few days day-dreaming about how I’d try to make a Giant Space Battle Game where moves occur in realtime (but stately, not rushed). Like Icehouse Space Battles (which I know exists, but I’ve never played). Only with croupier sticks. This image will not get out of my head. I have no idea how to design it. I just want a game where you gently push military pieces around with croupier sticks to resolve battles.
  7. I suspect I’ll like the 7 Wonders expansion, but it’s an expansion for a solid, harmless filler.
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Written by taogaming

June 9, 2011 at 5:54 pm

Posted in Ramblings

Tagged with ,

4 Responses

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  1. The upcoming Battleship: Galaxies might be along the lines you describe, though probaly not quite hugely epic until the expansions arrive.

    My game collecting burnout is triggered by a realization of how much real estate I am dedicating to this cardboard. My Steam library is just so much more efficient.

    Ben

    June 9, 2011 at 7:03 pm

    • *Slow Clap*
      “Oh good, that’s still working.”

      I’m not the biggest Steam fanboy in the world, but I do love some of what they’ve done.

      taogaming

      June 9, 2011 at 9:30 pm

  2. If people can talk about good things, they can talk about bad things as well. I’m in the same camp as Tom, except that there really have been no games I’ve even been interested in trying. So I’m “not buying crappy games”, but I’m still lamenting the lack of good ones.

    I wondered for a time if it was me, rather than the designers and publishers, who had changed over time. Yet I still love and play the games I have always loved, and I still hate the games I have always hated.

    ekted

    June 9, 2011 at 7:07 pm

  3. My own personal rule is stronger than “Don’t buy crappy games.” It’s “Try to buy only great games, or at the very least, games that tried something new.” I claim no particular moral insight, I’m trodding a path that I’ve seen time and time again in game collectors. You could call it burnout if you like (I did, before it happened to me).

    The approach I’ve been taking is to be very quick to take a chance on something that sounds different (most recently, Karnaxis), but slow to jump on a more standard release.

    The comments brim with Ameritrash that arouse my interest.

    You know, I just can’t seem to garner any excitement for American games as a whole. And the themes have a lot to do with it. I have no interest in zombies or ninjas or pirates. I’ve never found much use for dungeon crawls. Even the best of the American designs – I’ll point to Catacombs as a recent example – I tend to find more “OK, would play again” rather than anything I wish to add to my collection.

    But – I’ve found 2011 to be a very good year so far. I’ve really enjoyed Die Burgen von Burgund and Pantheon, neither of which feels like JASE to me. The fact that Macao continues to grow on me would seem to bode well for Die Burgen von Burgund. And Walter’s Rails of New England is delightful, if not easily categorized by nationality. Add in a bunch of enjoyable lesser lights, and I don’t find that Tom’s view holds for me.

    Joe Huber

    June 13, 2011 at 8:31 am


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