The Tao of Gaming

Boardgames and lesser pursuits

Three bidding decisions (Round #4)

Board #13 — Both vul, you are in second seat.
Opener bids 1NT (15-17). You hold —  S: T64
 H: 7
 D: KQ98542
 C: T2

(You are playing Cappelliti/Hamilton defense, so you can bid 2C showing a 1 suited hand if you want to compete cheaply, or you can bid 3 or more diamonds, or you can pass or or psyche).

Board #14 — You are dealer, none vulnerable.

 S: KT2
 H: A98
 D: QT
 C: KJ987

You South Partner North
-----------------------
1C  P     1N      P
P  X     P       2S
?

What do you do?

Board #15 — White vs Red. Opponents silent.

You hold  S: KJ32
 H: AT
 D: 87
 C: KJ973

Partner opens 1NT (15-17). What’s your plan? (You are playing Jacoby Transfers, but with no good/bad acceptance into minors, if that matters).

If you bid stayman then …

What I did and results below…

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Written by taogaming

April 27, 2009 at 7:06 pm

Posted in Bridge

2 Responses

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  1. Board 13: Playing Capp, there’s no point in acting. Everyone plays system on over that, so you aren’t interfering at all. Without the D10, you aren’t safe red at the three-level. You are short in the majors and out-gunned in high cards, so bidding just gives the opponents information. And it won’t help this time; responder is going to bid Texas no matter what you do. Declarer should make 4H, but he might not. You get butchered at the 5-level, so this isn’t your hand to win or lose. You just have to defend 4H and hope declarer doesn’t find his way home.

    Board 14: Passing 1NT is reasonable, particularly if you play it 8-10. Getting to play 1NT white is winning matchpoints. If your opponents know that, they’ll pretty much always balance, which is one reason to play 1C-1NT as 8-10. Opener can double if he knows his partner has something. If you play 1NT is 6-9, you probably should bid 2C, since your opponents will likely be acting and you want to authorize partner to bid 3C.

    Bidding over 2S is a guess, but I think it’s right to pass. The Law of Total Tricks, however, suggests that you bid. They have 7 or 8 spades and you have 8 or 9 clubs. That means total trumps is 15-17. If they are 16 or 17, you want to bid 3C. My experience, however, is that when all the hands are balanced, the LTT overestimates by a little. The SK10x is about a 1/3 trick downward adjustment, too. My guess is that you should expect 14-16 total tricks, which means if you make at the three-level, they are going down at least one. +110 vs. +50 or +100 isn’t enough of a gain to risk turning a plus into a minus. Going plus is very big at matchpoints.

    Looks like 2S is cold and 3C is down one. At both white, you want to compete to 3C, but I’d drag my heels with the 4333 hand and sell to 2S.

    Board 15: Start with Stayman and then bid 3C when partner bids 2H. Partner can still have two small diamonds.

    A club slam really isn’t in the picture, and you are not going to bid it, but there may be diamond weakness, in which case you might get to 4S on a 4-3 or 5C.

    Making six is easy on a spade lead. On a diamond lead, declarer might get spades right as an avoidance play. With the C10’s coming down, entry problems are mitigated. Note that it’s really not needed to see the C10 early; if you cash the CA, then play the CQ, as long as the next player follows suit, it’s safe to overtake with the CK. Also note that it is normal for third-hand to put in the DQ at T1 to prevent declarer’s hold-up, but it might not be a good play on this hand.

    In Standard, 1NT-2C; 2x-3m is natural and forcing, promises at least a five-card suit, and shows four of a non-fitting major. Some play that it is slammish, but that’s not best. Even at matchpoints, 5C making is better than 3NT down two. If you do not have a way to force in a minor directly (transfers, the dreaded Walsh relay, etc.), then the implication of a four-card major is lost. (And 3m is alertable.) A few play 3m as invitational or just to play, but without extremely complex structures, that’s not an efficient use of bidding space.

    JeffG

    April 28, 2009 at 4:07 pm

  2. Board 13: Playing Capp, there’s no point in acting. Everyone plays system on over that, so you aren’t interfering at all. Without the D10, you aren’t safe red at the three-level. You are short in the majors and out-gunned in high cards, so bidding just gives the opponents information. And it won’t help this time; responder is going to bid Texas no matter what you do. Declarer should make 4H, but he might not. You get butchered at the 5-level, so this isn’t your hand to win or lose. You just have to defend 4H and hope declarer doesn’t find his way home.

    Board 14: Passing 1NT is reasonable, particularly if you play it 8-10. Getting to play 1NT white is winning matchpoints. If your opponents know that, they’ll pretty much always balance, which is one reason to play 1C-1NT as 8-10. Opener can double if he knows his partner has something. If you play 1NT is 6-9, you probably should bid 2C, since your opponents will likely be acting and you want to authorize partner to bid 3C.

    Bidding over 2S is a guess, but I think it’s right to pass. The Law of Total Tricks, however, suggests that you bid. They have 7 or 8 spades and you have 8 or 9 clubs. That means total trumps is 15-17. If they are 16 or 17, you want to bid 3C. My experience, however, is that when all the hands are balanced, the LTT overestimates by a little. The SK10x is about a 1/3 trick downward adjustment, too. My guess is that you should expect 14-16 total tricks, which means if you make at the three-level, they are going down at least one. +110 vs. +50 or +100 isn’t enough of a gain to risk turning a plus into a minus. Going plus is very big at matchpoints.

    Looks like 2S is cold and 3C is down one. At both white, you want to compete to 3C, but I’d drag my heels with the 4333 hand and sell to 2S.

    Board 15: Start with Stayman and then bid 3C when partner bids 2H. Partner can still have two small diamonds.

    A club slam really isn’t in the picture, and you are not going to bid it, but there may be diamond weakness, in which case you might get to 4S on a 4-3 or 5C.

    Making six is easy on a spade lead. On a diamond lead, declarer might get spades right as an avoidance play. With the C10’s coming down, entry problems are mitigated. Note that it’s really not needed to see the C10 early; if you cash the CA, then play the CQ, as long as the next player follows suit, it’s safe to overtake with the CK. Also note that it is normal for third-hand to put in the DQ at T1 to prevent declarer’s hold-up, but it might not be a good play on this hand.

    In Standard, 1NT-2C; 2x-3m is natural and forcing, promises at least a five-card suit, and shows four of a non-fitting major. Some play that it is slammish, but that’s not best. Even at matchpoints, 5C making is better than 3NT down two. If you do not have a way to force in a minor directly (transfers, the dreaded Walsh relay, etc.), then the implication of a four-card major is lost. (And 3m is alertable.) A few play 3m as invitational or just to play, but without extremely complex structures, that’s not an efficient use of bidding space.

    JeffG

    April 28, 2009 at 4:07 pm


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